The Town of Faubion

Much has been written about how our local village of Welches got its name, but Welches isn’t the only town that is identified by the family that established it.

Just east of Welches and just past the historic Zigzag Ranger Station you will find Faubion Loop Road. Although a sleepy little residential area now, it once was the settlement of the William J. Faubion family.

Faubion PortraitWilliam Faubion moved his family to the area in 1907 from the Lents District of Portland. He and his wife Anna settled along the old Barlow Road, which was soon to become the Mount Hood Loop Highway. Just past Zigzag and at the base of Hunchback Mountain they built a home, which they later converted into a roadhouse, similar to our modern day bed and breakfasts. They namedĀ  it “La Casa Monte”, Spanish for “The Mountain House”.

William harvested the huge old cedar on his land, cut shake bolts and hunted to support his family. Several large stumps with springboard notches can still be seen from Highway 26 as you pass by the area. La Casa Monte was completely built from standard dimension hand split cedar boards, with no milled lumber. It was two story with cedar shingle siding, gabled roof and wide eaves. The recessed front porch had arched openings, the center one was reached by a short set of stairs leading to the front door. The interior was rustic with handmade furniture and many animals mounted and displayed, indicating Mr. Faubion’s hunting prowess and the abundance of game in the area. Mrs. Faubion was known for her cooking, particularly her huckleberry pies, making La Casa Monte an ideal destination.

La Casa MonteIn time, the addition of a store with a post office made Faubion a spot on the map. The post office was established in 1924, and was discontinued in 1932. The store and post office was operated by one of William and Anna’s daughters and son in law, Aneita (Faubion) and Thomas Brown. Many of the early motor car tourists travelling along the old Mount Hood road made La Casa Monte their first stop on their way to adventure on Mount Hood.

The Faubion’s had seven children, three boys and four girls. The oldest, a girl born in Gladstone, Oregon in 1890, was named Wilhelmina Jane (Jennie) Faubion. At twenty years old, Jennie married William “Billy” Welch, the son of Barlow Trail pioneers, and homesteaders of the area that would later become the village of Welches, Oregon. Jennie lived inĀ  Welches until she died in 1985 at 95 years old. Most of the other Faubion children lived in the area, and were well known and an important part of the history of the Mount Hood area.

Today, the Faubion Area is bypassed by the modern Mount Hood Highway 26, and is known now as Faubion Loop Road. La Casa Monte is gone, the store is still there, but is a private residence now. The residents that live there still know the history of their neighborhood, and identify themselves as living “At Faubion”.

 

5 thoughts on “The Town of Faubion”

  1. Thanks so much for writing this important History for the Mount Hood Country. With photos of the old house that my Grandfather made from the cedar trees that grew on the property.

  2. Hi Gary and William – I live above Faubion Loop on Jennie Lane. The neighbors on Faubion that live in the beautiful stone house (built by the late George Pinner) passed out a loose leaf booklet a few years back loaded with pictures, detailing the Faubion family’s settlement in the area. There are handwritten letters along with journal entries documenting their experiences living on the mountain. They may have extra copies. If you are interested, I have their email address and can put you in touch with them.

    1. Hi Susan. I used to live in Arlie Mitchell’s home on Pinner Rd – The big white one on the way up the hill. I know Ed and Lavonne and will ask if it’s different that one that they gave me prior, although I think that the one that I have addresses George Pinner, the builder of their stone home and many cabin fireplaces around Mount Hood. Thank you for your comment.

  3. really enjoy western history ( Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon Etc. ) that is not in most books, just mainly told by old timers of gone by day, thank you for keeping it alive

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